En-TITLE-ment

Recent chatter about copyright infringement concerning music (see Spirit’s “Taurus” vs. Zeppelin’s “Stairway to Heaven” or Robin Thicke and Pharrell Williams “Blurred Lines” vs. Marvin Gaye’s “Gotta Give it Up”) has reignited discussion of copyright issues in the literary world.

According to the Berne Convention (the international source for copyright law), your original manuscript is protected by copyright as soon as it is fixed in tangible form. That is, the moment your great American novel is written—on paper or your computer—you’re copyrighted. For how long, you ask? In the USA and much of Europe, it’s the creator’s lifetime plus 70 years.

But here’s the funny thing; book titles are not protected by U.S. copyright laws.

grace 4To qualify for such protection, a work needs to possess “a significant amount of original expression” and the courts have ruled that expressions as short as book titles do not qualify. (That’s why, when my book club pals had heard about a great book with the words “Ordinary Grace” in the title, we had to get more specific; there are almost 2,500 books to choose from!)

This doesn’t mean, however, that you can name your book Fifty Shades of Grey. Some titles qualify for trademark protection (series titles like The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, Twilight, etc.) if the grace 3books become successful enough to be considered recognizable brands. A trademark protects words, phrases, symbols, or designs that identify the source of the goods or services of one party and distinguish them from others.

So, while it would so clever to title your new cookbook, The Hunger Games, you can’t. But if you name it, A Place at the Table, nothing’s stopping you, except for the fact that 6 other writers have already done so. (Our book club read the version by Susan Rebecca White, if you’re interested.) I’d recommend coming up with some other imaginative wording – it avoids confusion. What if your fans buy the wrong book? Why help someone else have a best seller?grace 1

By the way, our book club chose the Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger. Thumbs up.

 

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2 Comments

Filed under books, English language, literary terms, publishing, reading, Uncategorized, writing

2 responses to “En-TITLE-ment

  1. I was actually just researching this in a completely different field, naming a new beer to go on the market. It’s basically the same thing, see Lagunita’s suing Sierra Nevada for use of the letters IP and A, a standard across the board when naming a certain type of ale.

    It’s equally as hard to think of a name of a beer as it is a name of a book! And I’ve got a work in progress about a brewery, so naming the beers in the book is like a literary inception. Argh.

    Great post, thinks for sharing!

    • How funny. It didn’t occur to me how difficult it would be to name a beer! But you’re right – the name game is the same.
      Good luck! Let me know if I can help. I live in one of the biggest microbrew towns around (Bend, Oregon) and I love working with titles … of anything!

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